Like most states, Kentucky has a point system whereby it assesses a certain number of points against your driver’s license every time you become convicted of a moving violation or pay your traffic ticket without going to court. By the way, in case you did not know, paying a traffic ticket acts as your guilty plea to the alleged traffic offense for which you received the ticket.

Not only do points result in your having to pay higher auto insurance premiums, but they also could result in your losing your privilege to drive. If you are an adult driver over the age of 18 and accumulate 12 points within a 24-month period, the state probably will suspend your driver’s license. If you are under the age of 18, the state probably will suspend your driver’s license if you accumulate seven points within a 24-month period.

3-point offenses

Conviction of or pleading guilty to any of the following assesses three points against your license:

  • Texting while driving
  • Careless driving
  • Failure to yield
  • Failure to obey a traffic signal, stop sign or railroad crossing signal
  • Driving the wrong way on a one-way street
  • Driving too fast or too slow for the road conditions

4-point offenses

Conviction of or pleading guilty to any of the following assesses four points against your license:

  • Reckless driving
  • Following too closely
  • Failure to control your vehicle
  • Driving on the wrong side of the road
  • Failure to yield to an emergency vehicle
  • Switching drivers while your vehicle is in motion

6-point offenses

Conviction of or pleading guilty to more serious offenses, such as failing to stop for a school or church bus, becoming involved in an incident resulting from a moving hazardous violation, or speeding 16-25 mph over the posted speed limit, assesses six points against your license.

Mandatory court appearance offenses

Some offenses require you to go to court and include a possible suspension as one of the penalties for conviction. These offenses include racing, eluding a law enforcement officer and driving 26 or more mph over the posted speed limit.